Resources

Skills to Promote Self-Acceptance

Skills to Promote Self-Acceptance

Self-Reflection Journaling

Keep a journal to explore and express your thoughts and feelings. Write about your anxieties, hopes, and self-discoveries, allowing for increased self-awareness.

Some creative writing prompts:

  • Reflect on a mistake or regret from your past that you're still holding onto. Write a letter of forgiveness to yourself, acknowledging your humanity and offering yourself compassion and understanding

  • Reflect on a time when you felt vulnerable and exposed. How did you navigate this experience, and what did you learn about yourself in the process?

  • List three things you appreciate about your body, regardless of its perceived flaws or imperfections. How can you celebrate and honor your body for all that it does for you?

Explore your core values to understand what your boundaries and expectations may be. These can help you understand your triggers and your "shadow" on a deeper, more accepting level.

Some personal values:

  • Honesty, Transparency, Justice, Freedom

  • Respect, Humility, Accountability, Equality

  • Belonging, Community, Spirituality

Positive Affirmations

Develop and repeat positive affirmations to counter negative thoughts. Affirmations can promote self-compassion and a more positive mindset.

Affirmations can sound like:

  • I am at peace.

  • I am confident.

  • I am enough just as I am.

  • I am deserving of all good things.

  • I am worthy of love and respect.

Focus on Strengths

Identify and celebrate your strengths and accomplishments. Acknowledge the unique qualities and abilities that contribute to your sense of self.

Strengths you could possess:

  • Courageous

  • Kind

  • Loving

  • Creative

  • Forgiving

  • Humble

  • Curious

  • Resilient

Self-Compassion Exercises

Practice self-compassion by treating yourself with the same kindness and understanding you would offer to a friend or a child. Recognize that everyone faces challenges and it's okay not to be perfect.

New Hobbies

The key to using hobbies for self-acceptance is to choose activities that resonate with personal interests, values, and preferences. Engaging in hobbies should be a source of joy, fulfillment, and acceptance, allowing individuals to embrace themselves fully and authentically.

  1. Journaling: Writing in a journal allows for self-reflection, self-expression, and exploring thoughts and feelings without judgment. It can help in understanding oneself better and accepting one's thoughts and emotions.

  2. Creative Arts: Engaging in creative activities such as painting, drawing, sculpting, or crafting can be therapeutic. It provides a nonverbal outlet for expressing emotions and allows for self-expression without limitations.

  3. Physical Exercise: Engaging in physical activities like yoga, dancing, or hiking not only benefits physical health but also promotes self-acceptance by fostering a positive relationship with one's body and embracing its capabilities.

  4. Cooking or Baking: Exploring culinary arts through cooking or baking allows for creativity and self-expression in the kitchen. It can also be a mindful practice, fostering a deeper appreciation for nourishing oneself and others.

  5. Reading and Writing: Engaging in reading books or writing poetry, fiction, or non-fiction allows for introspection and exploration of diverse perspectives. It can help in understanding oneself better and accepting different aspects of one's identity.

  6. Volunteering or Community Service: Giving back to the community or volunteering for causes that resonate with personal values can foster a sense of purpose and fulfillment. It promotes self-acceptance by recognizing one's ability to make a positive impact in the world.

  7. Traveling: Exploring new places, cultures, and experiences can broaden perspectives and foster self-discovery. Traveling encourages stepping out of comfort zones, embracing uncertainty, and accepting oneself amidst different environments and circumstances.

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

Celebrate Achievements

Acknowledge and celebrate your achievements, both big and small. Recognize your efforts and give yourself credit for accomplishments.

Be proud of yourself when you:

  • Drink enough water.

  • Make your bed,

  • Complete a household chore.

  • Go for a short walk.

  • Eat a good meal.

  • Exercise for 30 minutes.

  • Reach out for help.

Engage in Self-Care

Prioritize self-care activities that nourish your mind, body, and soul. This can include activities like taking a bath, reading a book, or spending time in nature.

My favorite self-care:

  • Going for a walk.

  • Listening to an informational podcast or audiobook, especially while doing skincare or my nails.

  • Answering a journal prompt.

  • Vacuuming.

  • Doing pre-shower makeup.

Challenge Negative Self-Talk

Challenging negative self-talk is a gradual process that takes time and practice. Be patient and compassionate with yourself as you work to cultivate a more positive and empowering self-view.

  1. Awareness:

  • Start by becoming aware of your negative self-talk patterns. Notice when you're being self-critical or engaging in negative thoughts about yourself.

  1. Identify Negative Thoughts:

  • Identify the specific negative thoughts or beliefs you're experiencing. Write them down if it helps to clarify them.

  1. Question the Evidence:

  • Challenge the validity of your negative thoughts by asking yourself for evidence that supports or contradicts them. Are there objective facts to support these thoughts, or are they based on assumptions or interpretations?

  1. Reality Testing:

  • Consider alternative perspectives or interpretations of the situation. Is there a more balanced or realistic way to view the situation?

  1. Cognitive Restructuring:

  • Reframe negative thoughts into more realistic, compassionate, and constructive statements. Replace self-critical thoughts with more balanced and affirming affirmations.

  1. Practice Self-Compassion:

  • Treat yourself with kindness and understanding, as you would a friend facing similar challenges. Offer words of encouragement and support to yourself.

  1. Challenge Distortions:

  • Recognize common cognitive distortions, such as black-and-white thinking, catastrophizing, or overgeneralization. Challenge these distortions by seeking evidence to support more balanced perspectives.

  1. Focus on Strengths and Achievements:

  • Shift your focus to your strengths, accomplishments, and past successes. Remind yourself of your abilities, resilience, and capacity to overcome challenges.

  1. Mindfulness and Acceptance:

  • Practice mindfulness to observe negative thoughts without judgment or attachment. Accept that negative thoughts may arise but recognize that they do not define you.

  1. Set Realistic Expectations:

  • Set realistic expectations for yourself and recognize that nobody is perfect. Allow yourself to make mistakes and learn from them, rather than expecting perfection.

  1. Challenge Perfectionism:

  • Challenge the belief that you need to be perfect or meet unrealistic standards. Embrace imperfection and recognize that mistakes are opportunities for growth.

    Seek Support:

  • Reach out to supportive friends, family members, or a therapist for encouragement and validation. Sometimes, an outside perspective can offer valuable insights and support.

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

Skills to Promote Mindfulness

Skills to Promote Mindfulness

Grounding Techniques

Use grounding exercises to connect with the present reality. This might include focusing on the five senses, such as feeling the texture of an object or listening to calming sounds.

Mindful Breathing: Close your eyes and focus on your breath for a few minutes. Notice the sensation of each inhale and exhale. How does your breath feel in your body? What thoughts or emotions arise as you pay attention to your breath?

Body Scan: While technically not a hobby, mindfulness meditation can be practiced regularly as a hobby-like activity. It encourages self-awareness, acceptance of the present moment, and compassion towards oneself.

Tune-IN: Take a moment to tune into your senses. What do you see, hear, smell, taste, and feel in this moment? Notice the details of your surroundings and how they contribute to your present experience.

Mindful Eating

Take a moment to mindfully eat a small piece of food, such as a raisin or a slice of apple. Notice the texture, taste, and sensations as you chew and swallow. How does eating mindfully change your experience of the food?

Yoga and Mindful Movement

Engage in yoga or other mindful movement practices. These activities promote both physical and mental well-being, fostering a mind-body connection.

Search "Trauma-Informed Yoga for Beginners" on Youtube for free routines that you can do at home.

Art and Creative Hobbies

Mindfulness Meditation: While technically not a hobby, mindfulness meditation can be practiced regularly as a hobby-like activity. It encourages self-awareness, acceptance of the present moment, and compassion towards oneself.

Outdoor Activities: Spending time in nature through activities like hiking, gardening, or nature photography can promote feelings of connection and acceptance of oneself as part of a larger ecosystem.

Music: Playing an instrument, singing, or simply listening to music can be a soothing and affirming hobby. Music has the power to evoke emotions, uplift spirits, and provide a sense of connection with oneself and others.

Volunteer, Virtually: Get involved with topics that interest you by volunteering with organizations that are involved and can offer education and growth, as well as experience and networking.

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

Self-Reflection Journaling

Keep a journal to explore and express your thoughts and feelings. Write about your anxieties, hopes, and self-discoveries, allowing for increased self-awareness.

Some creative writing prompts:

  • Write down one intention for how you'd like to show up in the world today. It could be a quality you'd like to embody, a behavior you'd like to cultivate, or a mindset you'd like to shift. How can you bring this intention into your actions and interactions?

  • Spend some time outdoors, whether in your backyard, a park, or a natural setting. Notice the sights, sounds, and sensations of nature around you. How does connecting with nature impact your sense of well-being?


Skills to Feel More Human

Skills to Feel More Human

Regular Exercise

Engaging in exercise can help you feel more present and more attuned to your body and your physical space. Exercise for even 15 minutes a day can help you feel alert and alive.

Nutrition

Understand your nutritional needs and where you may have deficiencies. A certified nutritionist can help you find ways to increase your intake and find healthy ways to get where you want to be.

Restful Sleep

Create a consistent sleep routine that allows you to feel safe, calm and comfortable so that you can get the recommended 6 - 8 hours of restful sleep at night.

Some things you could include are:

  • Lotion with your favorite relaxing scent

  • A candle,

  • A skincare routine

  • A music playlist

  • A book or podcast

Random Acts of Kindness

Performing acts of kindness for others can help connect you with others, can enhance your sense of humanity and can contribute to a positive mood.

Acts of kindness could look like:

  • Pay for Someone's Coffee: Pay for the coffee or meal of the person behind you in line at a coffee shop or drive-thru.

  • Leave a Positive Note: Write a kind note or message of encouragement and leave it in a public place for someone to find, such as on a park bench or in a library book.

  • Compliment Someone: Offer a genuine compliment to a stranger, friend, or coworker. It could be about their appearance, personality, or something they've done.

  • Hold the Door Open: Hold the door open for someone, whether they're entering a building, walking through a doorway, or carrying packages.

  • Help a Stranger: Offer to help a stranger in need, such as carrying groceries, helping someone cross the street, or assisting with directions.

  • Send a Thoughtful Text: Send a thoughtful text message or email to a friend or loved one, letting them know you're thinking of them and appreciate their presence in your life.

  • Express Gratitude: Take a moment to express gratitude to someone who has made a difference in your life, whether it's a family member, teacher, mentor, or friend.

Social Connection

Seek support from friends, family, or support groups. Relationships and shared experiences will help you feel connected, present and valued.

  • Reach Out to Friends and Family: Make an effort to regularly connect with friends and family members through phone calls, video chats, or in-person visits. Share updates about your life, listen to their experiences, and offer support and encouragement.

  • Join Clubs or Groups: Participate in clubs, organizations, or hobby groups that align with your interests. This can provide opportunities to meet like-minded individuals and foster new friendships based on shared activities.

  • Volunteer: Volunteer your time and skills to support causes or organizations that are meaningful to you. Volunteering not only allows you to give back to your community but also provides opportunities to connect with others who share similar values and passions.

  • Initiate Plans: Take the initiative to organize social gatherings or activities with friends, family, or colleagues. Whether it's a casual dinner outing, a movie night, or a weekend hike, initiating plans helps strengthen relationships and create opportunities for connection

  • Participate in Group Activities: Take part in group activities or classes such as exercise classes, art workshops, or cooking clubs. These activities provide opportunities for social interaction and shared experiences with others.

  • Practice Active Listening: Be present and attentive when interacting with others. Practice active listening by fully focusing on the speaker, asking questions, and showing genuine interest in their thoughts and feelings.

  • Join Online Communities: Join online communities or forums based on your interests or hobbies. Engage in discussions, share experiences, and connect with individuals who share your passions, regardless of geographical location.

Setting Personal Boundaries

Learn to set and assert personal boundaries. Knowing and communicating your limits can reduce stress and anxiety associated with overwhelming commitments.

  1. Identify Your Limits: Take time to reflect on your values, needs, and limits. What behaviors, actions, or interactions make you feel uncomfortable, disrespected, or overwhelmed? Understanding your boundaries is the first step in setting them.

  2. Communicate Your Boundaries Clearly: Be direct and assertive when communicating your boundaries to others. Use "I" statements to express your needs and limits in a non-confrontational manner. For example, "I need some alone time in the evenings to recharge" or "I feel uncomfortable when you make jokes about my appearance."

  3. Be Consistent: Consistently enforce your boundaries by maintaining firm and clear communication with others. Avoid making exceptions or allowing boundary violations, as this can lead to confusion and undermine your credibility.

  4. Practice Self-Awareness: Pay attention to your emotions and physical sensations to recognize when your boundaries are being crossed. Trust your instincts and prioritize your well-being by taking action to protect your boundaries.

  5. Set Consequences: Clearly communicate the consequences of violating your boundaries. This could involve limiting or ending contact with individuals who repeatedly disregard your boundaries, or taking other appropriate measures to protect yourself.

  6. Seek Support: Surround yourself with supportive individuals who respect and honor your boundaries. Share your boundaries with trusted friends, family members, or a therapist who can offer guidance and encouragement as you navigate setting and enforcing boundaries.

  7. Start Small: Begin by setting boundaries in low-stakes situations or with individuals who are more likely to respect your limits. As you become more comfortable with boundary-setting, you can gradually extend this practice to other areas of your life.

  8. Practice Self-Care: Prioritize self-care practices that support your overall well-being and help you maintain healthy boundaries. This could include activities such as meditation, exercise, journaling, or spending time with supportive loved ones.

  9. Be Flexible: Recognize that boundaries may need to be adjusted or renegotiated over time as circumstances change. Remain open to reassessing your boundaries and making necessary adjustments to ensure they continue to align with your needs and values.

  10. Be Kind to Yourself: Setting and enforcing boundaries can be challenging, especially if you're accustomed to prioritizing others' needs over your own. Be patient and compassionate with yourself as you navigate this process, and celebrate your successes along the way

Chronic Illness

Chronic Illness

Coping Skills for Chronic Illness

Coping with chronic illness can be challenging, but there are several coping skills that can help individuals manage their condition and improve their quality of life. Here are some coping skills for chronic illness:

  1. Education: Learn as much as possible about your condition, including symptoms, treatment options, and self-management strategies. Understanding your illness can help you feel more empowered and in control.

  2. Self-Care: Prioritize self-care activities that support your physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This may include getting enough sleep, eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly (within your limitations), practicing relaxation techniques, and engaging in activities that bring you joy.

  3. Seek Support: Reach out to friends, family members, or support groups who understand what you're going through. Sharing your experiences with others who can empathize can provide validation, encouragement, and practical advice.

  4. Emotional Expression: Allow yourself to acknowledge and express your emotions about living with a chronic illness. This might involve journaling, talking to a therapist, or engaging in creative outlets such as art or music.

  5. Mindfulness and Acceptance: Practice mindfulness techniques to cultivate awareness of the present moment and acceptance of your current reality. Mindfulness can help reduce stress, anxiety, and rumination, allowing you to better cope with the challenges of chronic illness.

  6. Set Realistic Goals: Break down larger goals into smaller, manageable tasks, and celebrate your achievements along the way. Focus on what you can do rather than what you can't, and adjust your goals as needed to accommodate fluctuations in your health.

  7. Maintain a Positive Outlook: Foster a positive mindset by focusing on gratitude, resilience, and optimism. Cultivate a sense of hope and purpose by finding meaning in your experiences and setting intentions for personal growth and well-being.

  8. Develop Healthy Coping Strategies: Identify healthy coping strategies that help you manage stress and cope with difficult emotions. This may include deep breathing exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, or engaging in hobbies and interests that provide distraction and enjoyment.

  9. Advocate for Yourself: Be an active participant in your healthcare by communicating openly with your healthcare providers, asking questions, and advocating for your needs and preferences. Take an active role in decision-making regarding your treatment and care plan.

  10. Focus on What You Can Control: Accept that there may be aspects of your illness that are beyond your control, and focus instead on what you can control, such as self-care practices, coping strategies, and lifestyle choices.

Galileo Health

Subscription-based healthcare app that allows you to instantly access the wisdom of expert doctors—for everyday health needs to complex and chronic conditions, they're ready to help with comprehensive treatment and support.

Mira Health Insurance

Subscription-based healthcare app that allows you to instantly access the wisdom of expert doctors—for everyday health needs to complex and chronic conditions, they're ready to help with comprehensive treatment and support.

Check My Body Health

Tracking Hormones with Mira*

Mira is the only at-home fertility monitor on the market using quantitative technology.

  • Tracks LH, E3G, PdG, and FSH

  • Identifies your 6 most fertile days

  • Predicts & confirms your ovulation

  • Translates your hormones into numbers

Order Your Own Labs

LabCorp: LabCorp offers a wide range of lab tests, including blood tests, urine tests, and genetic testing. You can order tests online through their website or visit one of their patient service centers for sample collection.

Quest Diagnostics: Quest Diagnostics also provides a variety of lab tests, including general health panels, STD testing, and hormone testing. You can order tests online and schedule an appointment at a Quest Diagnostics location for sample collection.

Everlywell: Everlywell offers at-home lab testing kits for various health concerns, including thyroid health, food sensitivities, and sexual health. You can order a test kit online, collect your sample at home, and send it back to the company for analysis.

Ulta Lab Tests: A platform that allows you to order blood tests online and visit a nearby lab to get your results. You can also access health screening services and promotions.

AnyLabTestNow: Any Lab Test Now offers professional lab testing for various health conditions at 220+ locations across the country. You can schedule a test online or walk in.

Health Testing Centers: Health Testing Centers partners with CLIA-certified labs to offer a wide range of lab tests, from cholesterol panels to cancer screenings. You can order tests online and visit a local lab for sample collection.

Depression

Depression

Coping Skills for Depression

Coping skills for depression are strategies and techniques that individuals can use to manage their symptoms, improve their mood, and enhance their overall well-being. Here are some coping skills for depression:

  1. Develop a Support System: Reach out to friends, family members, or support groups who can provide emotional support, understanding, and encouragement. Sharing your feelings and experiences with others can help alleviate feelings of isolation and loneliness.

  2. Practice Self-Care: Prioritize self-care activities that promote your physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This may include getting enough sleep, eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly, practicing relaxation techniques (such as deep breathing or meditation), and engaging in activities that bring you joy and fulfillment.

  3. Challenge Negative Thoughts: Identify and challenge negative thoughts and beliefs that contribute to your depression. Practice cognitive restructuring techniques to replace negative thoughts with more balanced and realistic ones. Keep a thought journal to track your negative thoughts and explore alternative perspectives.

  4. Establish Routine: Establish a daily routine and structure in your life to provide a sense of stability and predictability. Set small, achievable goals for yourself and celebrate your accomplishments, no matter how small. Stick to regular meal times, sleep schedules, and activities as much as possible.

  5. Engage in Pleasant Activities: Make time for activities and hobbies that you enjoy and that bring you pleasure. Engaging in enjoyable activities can help distract you from negative thoughts and emotions and improve your mood.

  6. Practice Mindfulness: Practice mindfulness techniques to stay present and grounded in the moment. Mindfulness can help you observe your thoughts and feelings without judgment and reduce feelings of anxiety and rumination. Techniques such as mindful breathing, body scans, and meditation can be particularly helpful.

  7. Seek Professional Help: If you're struggling to cope with depression on your own, don't hesitate to seek professional help from a therapist, counselor, or psychiatrist. Therapy can provide you with tools and strategies to manage your symptoms, explore underlying issues, and develop healthier coping mechanisms.

  8. Limit Stress: Identify sources of stress in your life and take steps to minimize or manage them. Delegate tasks, when possible, learn to say no to additional responsibilities, and prioritize self-care activities that help you relax and recharge.

  9. Focus on the Present: Practice focusing on the present moment rather than dwelling on the past or worrying about the future. Use grounding techniques, such as focusing on your senses or engaging in activities that require your full attention, to bring yourself back to the present moment when you notice yourself getting lost in negative thoughts.

  10. Celebrate Progress: Recognize and celebrate your progress and achievements, no matter how small. Give yourself credit for taking positive steps towards managing your depression and remember that healing takes time and effort.

Remember that coping with depression is a journey, and it's okay to seek help and support along the way. Be patient and compassionate with yourself as you navigate your healing journey, and remember that you're not alone.

Hero Journey Club: Mental Health Support While Video Gaming

Online Depression Support Groups

There are several online support groups and resources available for individuals experiencing depression. These groups offer a safe and supportive environment where members can share their experiences, receive encouragement, and connect with others who understand what they're going through. Here are some online support groups for depression:

  1. 7 Cups: 7 Cups offers free online support and chat rooms where individuals can connect with trained listeners and peers who provide empathetic support and encouragement for various mental health concerns, including depression.

  2. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA): DBSA offers online support groups for individuals living with depression and bipolar disorder. These groups provide a space for sharing experiences, coping strategies, and resources for managing depression.

  3. The Mighty: The Mighty is a community platform that offers online support groups and forums for individuals living with various mental health conditions, including depression. Members can share stories, ask questions, and connect with others who understand their struggles.

  4. SupportGroups.com: SupportGroups.com hosts online support groups for a wide range of mental health concerns, including depression. These groups provide a supportive space for individuals to connect with others who are experiencing similar challenges and share coping strategies.

  5. Reddit: Reddit hosts several depression-related subreddits where individuals can find support, resources, and community. Some popular subreddits include r/depression, r/mentalhealth, and r/AnxietyDepression.

  6. DailyStrength: DailyStrength offers online support groups and forums for individuals living with depression and other mental health conditions. Members can share their experiences, ask questions, and receive support from peers in a safe and supportive environment.

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

Seasonal Depression

Seasonal depression, also known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD), is a subtype of depression that occurs in a seasonal pattern, typically during the fall and winter months when daylight hours are shorter. While less common, some individuals may experience SAD during the spring and summer months, although this is rarer.

Light therapy, also known as phototherapy, is a common treatment for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and involves exposure to bright artificial light to simulate natural sunlight.

  • Mimicking Natural Sunlight: LED light therapy devices are designed to emit bright white light that closely mimics the spectrum of natural sunlight. This light exposure can help regulate the body's internal clock (circadian rhythm) and reset melatonin levels, which may become disrupted during the darker fall and winter months.

  1. Stimulating Neurotransmitters: Exposure to bright light, including LED light, can stimulate the production of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, which plays a key role in regulating mood and promoting feelings of well-being. By increasing serotonin levels, LED light therapy may help alleviate symptoms of depression associated with SAD.

Feelings

Feelings

Feeling your Feelings

Using mindfulness to sit with your feeling and be able to understand where they sit in your body, how you react to them and where they originated from is a powerful ability that will help connect your mind & body and allow you to feel safer and more present.

TV Shows, Movies and Podcasts

TV Shows

● Lie to Me

● This Is Us

● Fleabag

● Six Feet Under

● BoJack Horseman

Movies

● Inside Out

● Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

● The Fault in Our Stars

● Silver Linings Playbook

● Amélie

Podcasts

The Science of Happiness

The Mental Illness Happy Hour

Feel Better, Live More

The Moth

The Happiness Lab

The Hilarious World of Depression

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

TV Shows

● Lie to Me

● This Is Us

● Fleabag

● Six Feet Under

● BoJack Horseman

Movies

● Inside Out

● Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

● The Fault in Our Stars

● Silver Linings Playbook

● Amélie

Podcasts

The Science of Happiness

The Mental Illness Happy Hour

Feel Better, Live More

The Moth

The Happiness Lab

The Hilarious World of Depression

Unlocking Us, Podcast by Dr. Brown

Conversations that unlock the deeply human part of who we are, so that we can live, love, parent, and lead with more courage and heart.

Ekmans' Atlas of Emotion

The Atlas of Emotion is a tool to help people better understand what emotions are, how they are triggered and what their effects are, and how to become aware of emotions before acting on them.

Atlas of the Heart by Brené Brown

In Atlas of the Heart, we explore eighty-seven of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human and walk through a new framework for cultivating meaningful connection. This is for the mapmakers and travelers in all of us.

Tips to Connect to your Feelings

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost.

● Body Scan

● Meditation

● Self-Reflection

● Journaling

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

How to Release ‘Emotional Baggage’
and the Tension That Goes with It

You may be able to release trapped emotions by acknowledging them and connecting with them. Other practices that help you work through trauma may help.

Where Emotions are Felt in the Body

Where Emotions are Felt in the Body

Where Emotions are Felt in the Body

Based on a 2014 study by Glerean and his colleagues, this is a great graphic depicting 13 emotions and the corresponding body parts they activate (or don’t activate). Like on a heat map, increased activity corresponds with warmer colors (red, orange, yellow), while decreased responses correspond with cooler colors (blue, green, indigo).

When Trauma Gets Stuck
in the Body by Beth Shaw

Residual trauma perpetuates a state of hyper-vigilance, resulting in both physical and emotional manifestations. It rewires the brain's stress response system, keeping individuals stuck in survival mode. This leads to symptoms like intrusive thoughts, flashbacks, and physiological reactivity, impacting their present well-being and perpetuating the cycle of trauma.

Grief

Grief

Coping with Grief

Coping with grief is a deeply personal and individual process, but there are several strategies that can help individuals navigate their grief and find healing. Here are some ways to cope with grief:

  1. Acknowledge Your Feelings: Allow yourself to acknowledge and experience the wide range of emotions that come with grief, including sadness, anger, guilt, and loneliness. Recognize that these feelings are a natural part of the grieving process and allow yourself to feel them without judgment.

  2. Seek Support: Reach out to friends, family members, or support groups who can provide comfort, understanding, and validation during this difficult time. Talking about your feelings and sharing your experiences with others can help alleviate feelings of isolation and loneliness.

  3. Take Care of Yourself: Prioritize self-care activities that support your physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This may include getting enough rest, eating nourishing meals, exercising regularly, and engaging in activities that bring you joy and comfort.

  4. Express Your Emotions: Find healthy outlets for expressing your emotions, such as journaling, art, music, or physical activity. Expressing your feelings in creative ways can help you process your grief and find moments of relief and catharsis.

  5. Practice Mindfulness: Practice mindfulness techniques to stay present and grounded in the moment. Mindfulness can help you cope with overwhelming emotions and reduce feelings of anxiety and distress. Techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, and guided imagery can be particularly helpful.

  6. Establish Routines: Establishing routines and structure in your daily life can provide a sense of stability and predictability during a time of upheaval. Stick to regular meal times, sleep schedules, and activities as much as possible, even if it feels challenging.

  7. Set Boundaries: Set boundaries with yourself and others to protect your emotional well-being. It's okay to say no to additional responsibilities or social obligations if you're not feeling up to it. Give yourself permission to prioritize your needs and take things at your own pace.

  8. Seek Professional Help: If you're struggling to cope with grief or finding it difficult to function in your daily life, consider seeking professional help from a therapist or counselor. Therapy can provide a safe and supportive space to explore your feelings, gain insight into your grief, and develop coping strategies.

  9. Be Patient with Yourself: Grieving is a process that takes time, and there is no "right" or "wrong" way to grieve. Be patient and compassionate with yourself as you navigate your grief journey, and allow yourself the time and space you need to heal.

  10. Find Meaning and Purpose: Seek out activities, rituals, or practices that provide a sense of meaning and purpose in your life. Whether it's volunteering, engaging in spiritual or religious practices, or pursuing creative endeavors, finding meaning can help you navigate the challenges of grief and find hope for the future.

Remember that grief is a natural response to loss, and it's important to give yourself permission to grieve in your own way and on your own timeline. With time, support, and self-care, you can learn to cope with your grief and find healing and resilience in the face of loss.

Online Grief Support Groups

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

Books to Understand Grief

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

Podcasts to Grieve To

You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your medical care will cost. Under the law, health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance an estimate of the bill for medical items and services.

● You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services. This includes related costs like medical tests,prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.

● Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your medical service or item. You can also ask your health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.

● If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.

● Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate. For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 800-985-3059.

Helping Someone who is Grieving

Supporting someone who is grieving can make a significant difference in their healing process. Here are some ways you can help someone else who is grieving:

  1. Listen with Empathy: Be present for the person who is grieving and listen to them with empathy and compassion. Allow them to express their feelings and emotions without judgment or interruption. Sometimes, simply having someone to listen can provide immense comfort.

  2. Offer Practical Support: Offer to help with practical tasks such as cooking meals, running errands, or doing household chores. Grieving individuals may find it difficult to focus on daily responsibilities, so your assistance can be greatly appreciated.

  3. Respect Their Needs: Respect the grieving person's need for space and privacy, while also letting them know that you're available to support them whenever they're ready. Everyone grieves differently, so it's important to honor their individual process and preferences.

  4. Be Patient: Understand that the grieving process takes time and can be unpredictable. Be patient with the person who is grieving and allow them to move through their emotions at their own pace. Avoid imposing timelines or expectations on their healing journey.

  5. Offer Comforting Gestures: Offer small gestures of comfort and support, such as sending a heartfelt card, bringing flowers, or simply offering a hug. These gestures can convey your sympathy and let the grieving person know that you're thinking of them.

  6. Avoid Clichés or Platitudes: Avoid using clichés or platitudes when offering condolences, as they may come across as insincere or dismissive. Instead, offer genuine words of support and validation, such as "I'm here for you" or "I'm so sorry for your loss."

  7. Encourage Self-Care: Encourage the grieving person to prioritize self-care activities that promote their physical, emotional, and mental well-being. This may include getting enough rest, eating nourishing meals, exercising, and engaging in activities they enjoy.

  8. Provide Resources: Offer information about local support groups, counseling services, or other resources that may be helpful for someone who is grieving. Sometimes, connecting with others who have experienced similar losses can provide valuable support and validation.

  9. Follow Up: Check in with the grieving person regularly to see how they're doing and offer ongoing support as needed. Grief can be a long and complex process, so continue to be there for them in the weeks and months following their loss.

  10. Be a Compassionate Presence: Above all, be a compassionate and supportive presence in the grieving person's life. Your willingness to listen, offer comfort, and be there for them during this difficult time can make a meaningful difference in their healing journey.

Remember that everyone experiences grief differently, so it's important to approach each situation with sensitivity, empathy, and understanding. By offering your support and presence, you can help someone navigate their grief with greater strength and resilience.

iPhone Apps - COMING SOON

iPhone Apps - COMING SOON

Android Apps - COMING SOON

Android Apps - COMING SOON